Caesar, on his part, had but a small portion of his forces at the palace
where he was attacked. The rest were scattered about the city. He,
however, seems to have felt no alarm. He did not even confine himself to
acting on the defensive. He sent out a detachment of his soldiers with
orders to seize Ptolemy and bring him in a prisoner. Soldiers trained,
disciplined, and armed as the Roman veterans were, and nerved by the
ardor and enthusiasm which seemed always to animate troops which were
under Caesar's personal command, could accomplish almost any undertaking
against a mere populace, however numerous or however furiously excited
they might be. The soldiers sallied out, seized Ptolemy, and brought him
in.

The populace were at first astounded at the daring presumption of this
deed, and then exasperated at the indignity of it, considered as a
violation of the person of their sovereign. The tumult would have
greatly increased, had it not been that Caesar,--who had now attained all
his ends in thus having brought Cleopatra and Ptolemy both within his
power,--thought it most expedient to allay it. He accordingly ascended
to the window of a tower, or of some other elevated portion of his
palace, so high that missiles from the mob below could not reach him,
and began to make signals expressive of his wish to address them.

When silence was obtained, he made them a speech well calculated to
quiet the excitement. He told them that he did not pretend to any right
to judge between Cleopatra and Ptolemy as their superior, but only in
the performance of the duty solemnly assigned by Ptolemy Auletes, the
father, to the Roman people, whose representative he was. Other than
this he claimed no jurisdiction in the case; and his only wish, in the
discharge of the duty which devolved upon him to consider the cause, was
to settle the question in a manner just and equitable to all the parties
concerned, and thus arrest the progress of the civil war, which, if not
arrested, threatened to involve the country in the most terrible
calamities. He counseled them, therefore, to disperse, and no longer
disturb the peace of the city. He would immediately take measures for
trying the question between Cleopatra and Ptolemy, and he did not doubt,
but that they would all be satisfied with his decision.

[...]
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