In the mean time, while Cleopatra was spending the early years of her
reign in all this luxury and splendor, Caesar was pursuing his career, as
the conqueror of the world, in the most successful manner. On the death
of Pompey, he would naturally have succeeded at once to the enjoyment of
the supreme power; but his delay in Egypt, and the extent to which it
was known that he was entangled with Cleopatra, encouraged and
strengthened his enemies in various parts of the world. In fact, a
revolt which broke out in Asia Minor, and which it was absolutely
necessary that he should proceed at once to quell, was the immediate
cause of his leaving Egypt at last. Other plans for making head against
Caesar's power were formed in Spain, in Africa, and in Italy. His
military skill and energy, however, were so great, and the ascendency
which he exercised over the minds of men by his personal presence was so
unbounded, and so astonishing, moreover, was the celerity with which he
moved from continent to continent, and from kingdom to kingdom, that in
a very short period from the time of his leaving Egypt, he had conducted
most brilliant and successful campaigns in all the three quarters of the
world then known, had put down effectually all opposition to his power,
and then had returned to Rome the acknowledged master of the world.
Cleopatra, who had, of course, watched his career during all this time
with great pride and pleasure, concluded, at last, to go to Rome and
make a visit to him there.

The people of Rome were, however, not prepared to receive her very
cordially. It was an age in which vice of every kind was regarded with
great indulgence, but the moral instincts of mankind were too strong to
be wholly blinded to the true character of so conspicuous an example of
wickedness as this. ArsinoŽ was at Rome, too, during this period of
Caesar's life. He had brought her there, it will be recollected, on his
return from Egypt, as a prisoner, and as a trophy of his victory. His
design was, in fact, to reserve her as a captive to grace his _triumph_.

[...]
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